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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 70
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today with visits to four key states. among those stops was sanford, florida, and it's from there that our north american extraordinary has sent us this report. -- extraordinary has sent us -- correspondent has sent us this report. >> mitt romney. like his opponent, he's amassed countless air miles chasing every last vote. in those parts of america, the balance could tip in his favor. today his supporters gathered for one last rally to waive the flag and cheer their -- wave the flag and cheer their man. >> i'm extremely hopeful. i love my country too so i hope it gets the president it deserves. it's a wakeup call for america because i believe if we don't turn things around now our children will suffer and their children. >> it's been a bruising contest in an increasingly divided nation. an election fueled by one question above all -- who's got the stronger plan for the economy? >> what's the climate been like? >> difficult. very difficult. money's tight, people don't want to buy anything necessarily that they don't necessarily need. and they're losing their homes. >> the nex
in tampa, florida, where shoppers are hoping to get the early-bird holiday specials. with big retail chains opening their doors for black friday, on thursday night, there are complaints about companies putting commerce ahead of family time. walmart has been threatened with protests by its employees. the company filed a complaint with the national labor relations board hoping to stop the demonstrations, but the board won't rule on it before tomorrow. diane eastabrook looks at the personal price of thanksgiving day store hours. >> reporter: this is the calm before the storm at a chicago toys r us. manager danny soro thinks up to 10,000 shoppers will descend on the store when it opens thanksgiving evening, forcing his 300 employees to cut short their holiday. >> we open at 8:00 and we're expecting lines to start from 5 pm to go pretty much throughout the plaza. >> reporter: walmart, kmart, and sears are also opening tomorrow at 8pm; target's opening at 9:00pm. and while opening on turkey day is expected to mean big business for retailers, it's ruffling the feathers of many employees who won't
, david? >> florida and virginia right now. you want-- >> ifill: do you have a white board? >> i wish i did. i'm not that spiffy. we talked a lot about ohio. but to get to ohio mitt romney has to hurdle florida and virginia. and we've really got no real information but little whiffes of information, looking pretty competitive in both places. so the romney people should be looking nervously at both those states. >> woodruff: why do you say that, because they thought they would be doing better? >> because of who is come out to vote, the exit polls. they looked close in those state and romney really has to win those. >> ifill: what information are you picking up? >> i'm always fasinated by david's whiffs, and i think virginia is interesting because they had to extend the voting hours in virginia, from normal closing. >> woodruff: based on long-- >> long lines that people were in lines, which i think-- democrats are always cheered by larger turnout. that's a rule of thumb. >> ifill: we just heard in virginia they had to keep the polls open or won't-- they won't report results until 8:00, ev
and florida. if laura trevelyan is in miami. clyde is in cleveland. let's start with you. have aligned and as long there as they have been everywhere else in the country -- have the lines been as long there as they have been everywhere else in the country? >> they have been pretty long. at about 7:00 this morning, the actual stores open at 6:30 a.m., and there were already 20 people there. and it was a slow trickle. election officials are estimating about 70%, not as high in the previous election. but lorimar, millions have already voted in early voting -- but remember, millions have already voted in early voting in this state. we did see joe biden breeze in to try to shore up the final push for votes. president obama has had a bit of a lead during the last few months and it has tightened in the last few months -- few weeks. unemployment is lower. there are fewer foreclosures. there is a sense of optimism here and that has helped president obama, but it is tight. statistically, is still within the margin of error. we could be in for a long night. >> i hope not. thanks very much. laura
of florida to teach african american history to 3.6 million kids. we have a curriculum, k-12. each year, we do more. we have an ipad app coming out in january. it is amazing, because we keep touching these points. with the exception of "america i am," we don't know of anybody else trying to do it quite like this. failure is a four-lane highway, success is under construction. we are under construction and we are driving this thing and we want to build this highway. tavis: as we have been talking, our director, jonathan, has been flashing through some of the items in the collection. give the audience some sense of the collection. there is a whole book, obviously, but in terms of the kind of artifacts. you have paintings, you have -- >> paintings, books, manuscripts, documents, going back to the 1600's. tavis: you have a combination. >> we have a combination, and bernard has been an historian and the family for a number of years. for me, i always wanted to know when friends were coming into my house as artists. i have become friends with a lot of them, been able to share them with other friend
not win the election in ohio. let's go to florida because that's where we saw the latino vote grow but not just cuban-americans which everybody talks about when they talk about florida. not just puerto rico-americans who were supporting barack obama but even venezuela, i mean, they targeted that precisely. >> right. the obama campaign is more -- but the gains in florida had been a republican strong hold for decades. he got 35% of the cuban-american vote. that was considered a pretty good number. some polls showed him at 50%. you mentioned the puerto rican community. that community is growing by leaps and bounds. that's the fastest growing group in florida. they have supported republicans. they campaigned for jeb bush. they came out for former president george bush. they came out in droves for barack obama. so he just -- he just crushed it in those community. gwen: where was the miscalculation, dan? say in ohio? >> the underestimation or the failure to deal with the auto bail out. if there is one thing that governor romney did was the auto bailout. the obama campaign almost from sta
that greeted the governor at this early morning rally in sanford, florida. >> look, we have one job left. that's to make sure that on election day we make certain that everybody who is qualified to vote gets out to vote. we need every single vote in florida. ( cheers and applause ) >> warner: romney said tuesday will prove a turning point for the country. >> tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. tomorrow we begin a better tomorrow. this nation is going to begin to change for the better tomorrow. >> warner: after florida he made two stops in virginia. lynchburg in the center of the state >> perhaps some of your family and friends have not yet made up their mind who they're going to vote for. so ask them to look beyond the speeches and the ads and all the attacks because talk is cheap. ask them to look at the record. a record is real and it's earned with real effort. the president promised change but change can't be measured in speeches. it's measured in achievement. >> warner: in fairfax an independent voter rich suburb of washington d.c. >> so many of you look at the big debates in this country no
returned to the campaign trail today with three events in florida. the g.o.p. presidential nominee also mentioned the ongoing recovery in the northeast. >> this is... this is quite a time for the country, as you know. we're... we're going through trauma in a major part of the country, a kind of trauma you've experienced here in florida more than once. and... and it's interesting to see how people come together in a circumstance like this. we've seen folks from all over the country step forward and... and offer contributions. >> woodruff: bumps in the recovery were evident in new york city late today, where the public, bellevue hospital , started evacuating about 500 patients because of deteriorating conditions. >> ifill: and for more on fill a short time ago governor cuomo said laguardia area will open for flights tomorrow morning. today's developments, we're joined again tonight by warren levinson of the associated press. he's been making his way around new york city today, and is just back from a trip to the evacuated bellevue hospital. warren, what do we know about why they decided t
. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the president of the united states by more than 2 million votes, john. i don't believe it is a mandate. >> why isn't a mandate if it is such a big win? >> a mandate for what? a mandate to work together, certainly the entire country wants that. but the real fire bell in the night on this election is for the republican party. there are 100 million folks in this country who are black, brown, asian, hispanic, middle eastern, they voted between 70 and 90% democratic and the white vote only went by 18 points to mitt romney. john of the seven largest states in the country, illinois, new york, pennsylvania, california have gone democratic in six straight elections. the other two, ohio and florida have swung democratic in two elections. and in texas, the white folks in chief connection texas -- texas are now a minority. >>> do you think this w
the summer. >> rose: let me ask about florida, john harris, and pennsylvania. >> it looks like florida is most likely in romney's camp. not certain. it seems to me that if obama wins florida he's going to win a bunch of other states and we'll have a map that looks more like 2008 than we've been thinking this last month or so where hi would win most of the state he is won in 2008 minus north carolina and indiana. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battleground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because w
for governor bush in florida, governor chris in florida. >> why adopt you and the rest. panel praise andrew? >> i do. i commend him. >> was he letter perfect? >> yes. >> why did he choose to defend the probability, if that's what it is, on the who climate change? he's lived through it. >> he wants to run for president. >> there's 20 feet of water -- >> as he put it, these 100 years storms are coming every two years. it's the new normal, and he unders as the governor of a state that's there vulnerable, how do you handle the infrastructure? >> who gets resources, all that? that's what it's all about, john the transfer of pour to federal governments from federal governments government to global institutions. >> every time you get a disaster, they say hey, we can solve it but we'll need more money and more power. >> what about andrew? >> what can the democratic party do for andrew? >> andrew is going to be a real player. >> is and dry eligible to -- andrew eligible to become president? >> absolutely. >> do you think he will have a bigger platform? >> he will, he will have a bigger platform if h
the presidency without winning. ohio will be the decisive state. if president obama wins florida, it moves the -- >> i could see florida being -- >> what i heard democrats talk about if they can hold ohio, hold wisconsin, paul ryan's home state, hold nevada, they could lose all other swing states, lose the congressional district in maine and come out with exactly 270 electoral votes. gwen: you add it up that way, john? >> that sounds very powerful. what i am struck by is there hasn't been any mystery about this. if you go further than a year ago, president obama's team was very straightforward. they expected it was going to be mitt romney. they were going to make him very unacceptable. the wealthy and out of touch background. they did that. they had a micro targeted micromessage strategy. they said what they were going to do. and stuck to that strategy seems to be with remarkable discipline. if it works, they look really, really smart. the difference between being really smart and really dumb -- [laughter] >> what's remarkable is that they broadcast that, right? >> and the romney campaign
.e.o. of florida-based bank united. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! $4.5 billion and guilty pleas to charges of manslaughter and lying to congress. that was the admission today from b.p. two and a half years after the "deepwater horizon" disaster in the gulf of mexico. that disaster killed 11 people and led to the worst oil spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged wit
this message. >> woodruff: but the romney campaign also began airing a spanish-language ad in florida tying obama to latin american dictators hugo chavez and fidel castro. >> we are america's women. >> woodruff: and american future fund, a super pac supporting romney is running ads targeting women in michigan and pennsylvania, states considered safely democratic. as you can see on the "newshour's" vote 2012 map center" there are seven states currently considered by the associated press to be true toss ups: nevada, colorado, iowa, ohio, virginia, florida and new hampshire. it shows each candidate's quickest potential path to 270 electoral votes. including one scenario giving president obama a path to victory, winning nevada and ohio, to get to 277 electoral votes. for mitt romney the path could also lead through ohio, and blanketing the south, to get to 281 in a different scenario. and there are also several potentials for a tie. this one shows the president losing nevada but winning ohio, to get to 269 for both candidates. and late today, the "newshour" got word that romney will make a last
say they can and will win, but they can win only if they take the vital swing states of florida, virginia and ohio. anything less than the prospects receive for them. >> this race is very, very close. it may confound pollsters and pundits alike. it's not clear how or if hurricane sandy will affect the results, but i think we can venture this far -- president obama appears to be holding on to a very narrow lead. adam brooks, bbc news, washington. >> bold predictions in a tight race. as adam just reported, no state is more hotly contested than ohio. laura is in cleveland for us tonight at a cleveland market for us tonight, laura. i imagine you've been chatting to shoppers today. what have they been telling you about the state of this race? >> well, it's very interesting. the one thing that you hear above anything else is that people are totally and utterly fed up with the political ads on television. i counted 16 last night. so the major sense of it is we're really waiting for this all to be over. but, yes, people feel flaccid in a way that this is such an important thing and it m
to be with you. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we talk health care reform with florida's largest health insurer. the chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue, patrick geraghty, joins us. and how's business at 35,000 feet? an update on the nation's airlines as the busy holiday travel season heats up. >> susie: we know these are tough times for businesses to get loans. it's even harder for non- profits. last night, we told you how individual investors are helping to finance local organizations with community investment notes. tonight, diane eastabrook shows us how this investment is creating jobs in one of chicago's poorest neighborhoods. >> reporter: this looks like an ordinary store on the outside, but inside, it's something else. the nonprofit stewards market is three businesses in one. there's king lizzy, a boutique specializing in urban t-shirts, hats, and custom-painted sneakers; a recording studio for budding hip-hop artists; and a business that washes and refills soap and shampoo bottles for hotels. all three provide jobs for at- risk teens and young adults like shevelle walton. >> i was looki
in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charl
votes-- 33 more than needed. he also was running ahead in florida, for another 29 electoral votes, but the state had not yet been called after long lines on tuesday held up the count. the president built his victory over mitt romney on a series of wins in battleground states, for 332 electoral votes-- 62 more than needed. that total included florida's 29 electoral votes, which were romney won white voters, but their share of the electorate was down slightly from 2008. mr. obama overwhelmingly captured black and latino voters. last night, he sought to appeal to both sides of the political divide. >> whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. with your stories and your struggles, i return to the white house more determined and more inspired than ever about the work there is to do, and the future that lies ahead. ( applause ) >> reporter: as a first step, the president telephoned congressional leaders today to talk about priorities for the rest of the year. he also said he hopes to talk to romney in the d
have voted for democrats and independents. the perfect guy may be marco rubio. latin, florida, changing state to appeal, young. he is conservative but he has to appeal to latinos, he might be the answer. can he win the primaries? will he win the primaries? tavis: to your point -- he was lacking something for romney. romney could have taken the guy and he did not. >> romney went to ryan. a tea party year. -- partier. i will give you my campaign in 2016 if they pick them. in 1992, follow this closely, folks. clinton ran against bush. and defeated him largely due to ross perot. tavis: on the larry king program, the debate. >> in 2016, clinton against bush. hillary and jeb. now that already we are thinking 2016, that would be a campaign. the question is can jeb bush win the primaries? tavis: that is funny. >> can he be a strong candidate? absolutely. that would be a hell of race. tavis: you think hillary should run? >> if i were an adviser i would hope she would run. i -- we are ready for a woman president on either take it. we have had a certain point where the clintons, clinton helped ele
widows i had never seen -- >> in dc. >> in d.c. >> in florida, where we think there was a voter suppression effort, the african-american vote went from 11% to 15%. >> mark? >> two point. not to tap dance on mitt romney's campaign, but what was the bold idea of the romney campaign that would survive his candidacy? barry goldwater energize the thousands of people. he gave his party and new direction. george mcgovern did that. but i just do not think there was. once you do not have a bold idea, the candidacy is in peril. >> governor romney survived several primaries, tough debates to get the nomination. there is a lot of second- guessing. i know, he wrote about it today. >> he introduced to the nation this idea of a more strict constitutional conservatism. however, i do not think they ought to go around complaining about choice of candidates. they threw away senate seats that were absolutely slam-dunk republican in indiana and missouri, and the last cycle they throw away a slam dunk republican seats in maryland, colorado, and nevada. so, the left and the right of the party and all
-mails to a woman in florida coup may also be going after general petraeus. she sends these also through a gmail account. shocked to think they got caught. this is doumb and dumber. >> colby, you have military and national security experience. your thoughts on this? >> war is hell and it has taken its toll on our top generals. nothing general petraeus has done detracts from his record. what happened is extremely confusing. the investigation done by the fbi, but they determined there was no question of loyalty, no national security compromise. they stop. there is another aspect of this thing, suitability for conduct. you can be a patriot, but if you are habitually to excess, that, a problem with the access to classified material. the justice department with all that i don't know why they did it. >> margaret? >> these things are done clandestinely until they are not. love is fleeting, gmamiil isn't. we are addicted to e-mail and we put things in it we don't want to be seen, but we hold the cia director to a higher standard. but i wonder with our military and political figures, to -- if it is in so
states, ohio, florida, virginia, and pennsylvania. obama lost by a slim margin among the voters 30 and older. he would not have carried those states. but for the strong support, 60% or more among younger voters in those states. and i think even more importantly, he had the turnout among young voters and he didn't even lose in the margin in some of those key states, in virginia, ohio, and florida he won by the same margin among young people that he did four years ago. while slipping a bit nationwide, he kept the energy and kept the support among young voters where it counted. >> suarez: when we try to slice and dice the electorate, is there really a youth vote? every youth is something else? they come from their region, come from their state, educate or not, high income, low income. is a youth voter more like another youth voters than other catholics, other southerners? >> it's true. this is a diverse generation. baby boomers were characterized as something. they're very diverse. all the generations have differences, but this generation really has a character that showed up early on
: boise is now in the east, huh? >> boise is in the east, san diego is in the east and south florida and central florida are also up in the east. yes. it makes no sense at all. and, by the way, the big ten has 14 teams now. >> jeff: (laughs) i was going to say map makers have to get to work but so do mathematicians. john feinstein, thank you so much. >> thank you, jeff. >> suarez: again, the major developments of the day: internet and cell phone service was down in syria, and there was fighting near the airport in damascus, as rebels battled government forces. democrats and republicans accused each other of refusing to talk specifics about how to avoid the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner said there's been no progress in the last two weeks. and the u.n. general assembly voted to recognize palestine as a non-member observer state. the u.s. was one of only nine states voting no. and, you've heard the term "glacial pace"? not exactly, says one director who's scaled enough ice, to know better. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: filmmaker james balog spent years documentin
important ohio or florida are and when those vote counts change. another very interesting thing we've done with this map center is load it full of different types of data that you can take a look at. for example, here are the electoral results in historical context. do you think tonight will be a landslide? it's nothing compared to 1972 where mcgovern got 17 electoral votes and nixon got 520. we also have, for example, unemployment data. you've seen the campaigns talk about unemployment over and over again. and what you can do on this map is go ahead and take a look. you can see california has 9.7% unemployment. nevada has 11.2%. florida has 8.6%. you can go dive in on a state-by-state level as well. finally we've also got a lot of demographic data in here. this, for example, is a breakdown as how the country looks by ethnicity. the more pink, the larger hispanic population. new mexico has 46%. texas has 37%. these are just some of the data sets. whether it's demographic or economic or historical or a little bit of context that you like from the newshour so much. we'll be back. >> ifill: w
. >> if there was even a short-lived airline in florida, i read about, that offered five-star evacuation service in the events of hurricane. >> yea, after hurricane katrina a company in florida saw a market opportunity and they decided to offer a charter airline that would turn your hurricane into a luxury vacation. that was actually the slogan. they would let you know a hurricane was headed to your area. they would pick you up in a limousine and drive you to the airport and they would make you five-star hotel reservations at the destination of your choice. why does a hurricane have to be bad news, after all? >> this kind of privatization is what you wrote about in shock doctrine, that privatization of resources, mopolization of resources by the rich in times of crisis further divides us as a society. >> exactly. one of the things about deregulated capitalism is that it is a crisis-creation machine. you take away the rules and you'll have serial crises, and there will be economic crises, booms and busts or there will be ecological crises. you're going to have both. you're just going have shock a
, it was an easy case, it really was. >> rose: why was it so easy? >> look,. >> rose: you stopped the florida court -- >> yes, but on a principled question of whether the florida courts violated the constitution. the vote was seven to two. it wasn't even close. the only issue that was five to four was whether we should put an end to this nonsense and immediately decide the case or give them another couple of weeks while the whole world was laughing at us and we couldn'tn't -- >> rose: the country couldn't decide who was present. >> that's right and we couldn't have a transition. >> rose: but people think it was a political decision. that's part of the reason they think it was a political decision. not so much -- they think it was a political decision because th politics of the country made you say we have got to do this the way we did it in order to get this over with. the court decided that in the interest of the national -- in the national interests they have got to bet this over with. >> the remedy for a case is always subject to the court's discretion. and always depends upon the realities on t
operateding to produce capacity. >> we're joined from jupiter florida. what are your colleagues facing lewis? >> they're facing restoration process with a storm that covers so many states and has done so much damage as everybody is seeing on tv. they have many, many lines down, poles down, transformers damaged. substations that are under water, and have to get dried out. equipment vault that is are flooded. they lot of work ahead of them. >> tom: how does a ceo -- how do you begin to prioritize all of that work? >> actually, the priority is pretty well established before the storm even hits. every utiltd works with emergency operations center and develops a priority list. typically the way it works is critical infrastructure customers get their power back first. critical infrastructure customers would be things like police stations hospitals, nursing homes, fire departments, you know, people who deal with the public safety and public health. after that, the focus then is on what work can be done to get the most number of customers back the fastest. >> tom: you've been talking with colleagues
be material." we spoke with lewis hay, executive chairman of next-era energy, the parent company of florida power and light. here's more of that conversation, beginning with the cost of the repair jobs for power companies in the northeast. >> well, this repair job is going to cost a huge amount of money. i don't think anybody can truly estimate what the cost is going to be. but it will be a lot of money. when we had hurricane wilma it cost us over a half a billion dollars. and this storm is much more extensive than-- expensive than that. the good news is the utilities have the balance sheets and the financial wherewithal to foot the bill. and you know, their vendors aren't going to be sending them bills for quite some time. so they will get the equipment. they will get everything they need because the vendors know they will get paid. >> could this wind up as a rate increase in the months or years ahead as they try to pay for some of the storm damage can. they go back to their rates in those states. >> typically in a storm of this sort utilities do go back to their rate commissions. and seek
's an interesting point. with the african-american community, we just saw in florida, one polling presignature, 1,000 votes through some computer glitch that could be explained, voting oppression was a key issue with some african-american voters that had not supported president obama, being ticked off, being really mad and looking at this as a republican tactic to suppress their votes and now they are going to be full scale with president obama. >> belva: as we wrap this up, have any of you seen an election light this one in your years of working? >> no, never. this is one for the books. >> not at all. >> well, the dynamics are just so unusual. how many times do you have this many storylines coming together, with the economy, with jobs, with the contentious race with a divided elector rate and with really no actual agreement on what to do. i think even inside political constituency groups, people bicker all the time about what's the appropriate course. >> belva: well, that is why the next story is going to move into view, because we've had so much bickering over so many weeks and no agreement ove
on the electoral vote, at least. >> i didn't get florida for him. in that column. >> belva: so, what are your thoughts now? what made you so sure that this was going to be our future? >> a couple of things. no incumbent president -- there's a lot of noise we hear day-to-day in political coverage, this person made this gaffe or that person had this many people at their rally, but the truth is, no incumbent president who has not had a challenge from his own party in the primary has lost re-election since 1932, herbert hoover. it is almost impossible to defeat an incumbent president when his party is unified. second, the auto bailout was enormous. i lived in ohio. i have family in cincinnati and toledo. 1 in 7 jobs in ohio is related to the auto industry. and there were 10,000 people working at that jeep plant in toledo. that community was terrified. and they had a clear black and white choice on that one issue. who was for them, who wasn't for them? and then, finally, there was a weak field. let's be honest. the primary candidates were one of the weakest fields that the republicans had ever run
journal" website, might swing republican and be susceptible to ads about gun control. or a florida female who's registered independent, with children under 18 years old, and is a pet owner mainly democrat and could be susceptible to ads about education issues. >> cool graphics. interesting report. who used this technique? >> both campaigns used this pretty aggressively. the obama campaign probably more so, because they had a head start. they knew who their candidate was going to be and they've been working on this for years. >> is it all legal? i mean, how do they -- >> it's interesting they mention that, it's so much of the information we generate today. we're opting to share that on facebook and all the social networks. we leave this huge digital trail online. in a way we might not do in the offline world. >> basically you're only targeting or finding out about people on facebook and twitter and in the social media. and the old folks, or on the other side of the digital divide, we don't know much about them. >> no, i think those folks are still targeted the old-fashioned way. publishers
the white house when you're engaging in a potentially criminal investigation. the agent in florida who then worried that the investigation was being stalled and went to a republican congressman who went to eric cantor, he has an illustrious record. he helped bring down the millennium plot. you can't blame him, either, for his apparent concern that this was not being studied appear prop it i can't tellly. so then the story got out, and i think general petraeus has acted honorably in resigning. i think he is going to do fine. he is going to get a book contract. he apparently wants to be president of princeton. he will have a year of probably giving speeches, making a lot of money. i don't feel sorry for him. >> if he wrote a book with the lady who wrote about him, paula broadwell, all in the education of david petraeus. he cooperated practically on the entire book. now he's going to write another book? >> he can write one about himself. he's not the author of this. this is somebody writing about him. >> this is his -- >> that's what happens when you screw up. you get all these offers. th
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